Structured group diabetes education for the non-English speaking BME community

Summary

The CCG commissioned the Cheetham Al-Hilal Community Project (AHCP) to deliver a course to meet the needs of their community, with a pilot seeing local diabetes specialists partnering with community leaders to adapt and design education courses for people with Type 2 diabetes. In all, 90% of participants were self-referrals, with just 10% from practices, reflecting the community’s success at engaging their community, and all reported that the course helped them find something they could do to better manage their diabetes. They were delivered by GP facilitators from the AHCP and community bi-lingual group workers, supported by health trainers from Manchester Mental Health & Social Care Trust and quality assured by a Diabetes Nurse Consultant (DNC).

Challenge

Results of the National GP Survey (2012) showed that only 43% of NMCCG respondents felt they ‘received enough support’ to manage their own health compared with 53.1% for comparable CCGs and 58% for England as a whole. To address this, in 2013 NMCCG commissioned Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust (PAHT) to provide a Community Diabetes Specialist Nurse (CDSN) diabetes education programme. However, early feedback from the course showed that the local BME community were under-represented and that some of those referred were rejected because they were unable to speak English sufficiently well. The CCG considered this all the more important because around 25% of their population are from the BME community, because diabetes is far more common among them and because their morbidity and mortality from diabetes is considerably higher than those of white, European origin. Cheetham Al-Hilal Community Project, a local mosque-based charity approached NMCCG to propose a diabetes education programme delivered by them to address this and meet the needs of their community. This led to a pilot that saw local diabetes specialists partnering with community leaders to adapt and deliver a structured group education course for people with Type 2 diabetes, for their community. 

Objectives

The aims of this pilot were to provide equity of access to structured group Type 2 diabetes education for the underserved BME community of NMCCG, ensuring that course design and delivery was culturally sensitive and appropriate, the local community engaged with the service, and participants felt that the course helped them to better manage their diabetes and adopt a more healthy lifestyle.

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QiC Diabetes Highly Commended 2015
Best initiative to support equality of care in vulnerable and 'hard to reach' groups
Structured group diabetes education for the non-English speaking BME community
by North Manchester Clinical Commissioning Group



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