Supporting the administration of insulin in schools

Summary

Changes from twice-daily insulin to basal bolus regimens in children presented Nottingham Children’s Hospital (NCH) with a problem. While the regimen was better at controlling diabetes in children, it meant they were likely to need to administer insulin during the school day, and schools were often reluctant to help with this, usually because of genuine concerns about making a mistake and harming the child. This often meant parents attending school during the day to give their child insulin.

A team from NCH, local PCTs and the city and county education authorities decided to tackle the problem. 

Challenge

The aims were to ensure that every child who needed support in managing their diabetes in school received it: schools needed to be happy about providing such support and aware of their rights and responsibilities in doing so.


The join taskforce also wanted to ensure staff providing support (including, if necessary, giving insulin injections) were fully trained and the child or young person with diabetes and their family would feel confident and happy with dealing with their diabetes at school.


Finally, they wanted to ensure every child or young person with diabetes would be fully able to participate in all aspects of school life and not suffer any disadvantage as a result of having diabetes.


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