Type 1 diabetes out of hours support service

Summary

Cambridge University Hospitals implemented a 12-month pilot of an out-of-hours telephone support line to improve the self-management of adult patients with type 1 diabetes who have complex needs. The support line provides patients with 24-hour, seven day a week access to a specialist diabetes service, and is also available to GPs who may require out-of-hours advice. Already, data has demonstrated that emergency admissions have been prevented in 30 per cent of calls. The system is estimated to produce cost savings of £60,933 compared to the £14,100 cost to set up and maintain the service. Consideration is also being given to similar services for other long-term conditions.

Challenge

Self-management is at the centre of type 1 diabetes care but patients with complex needs may require more clinical support to prevent repeat attendances and admissions, leading to poorer quality of life and increased costs to the Trust. This pilot runs alongside a Trust-wide admissions prevention scheme to reduce readmissions among patients with complex type 1 diabetes. This earlier paediatric scheme highlighted 473 admissions due to either diabetic ketoacidosis, hyper- or hypoglycaemia, many of which it was felt could have been avoided if those patients could have had access to specialist advice and support by telephone. If it is assumed the adult pilot produces the same results, it would receive 468 calls a year and it has already demonstrated that emergency admissions can be prevented in 30 per cent  of calls.

Objectives

Self-management is at the centre of type 1 diabetes care but patients with complex needs may require more clinical support to prevent repeat attendances and admissions, leading to poorer quality of life and increased costs to the Trust. This pilot runs alongside a Trust-wide admissions prevention scheme to reduce readmissions among patients with complex type 1 diabetes. This earlier paediatric scheme highlighted 473 admissions due to either diabetic ketoacidosis, hyper- or hypoglycaemia, many of which it was felt could have been avoided if those patients could have had access to specialist advice and support by telephone. If it is assumed the adult pilot produces the same results, it would receive 468 calls a year and it has already demonstrated that emergency admissions can be prevented in 30 per cent  of calls.

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QiC Diabetes Winner 2013
Best admissions avoidance and/or safe discharge initiative
Type 1 diabetes out of hours support service
by Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Contacts

Helen Brown

Job title:
Dietitian and Insulin Pump Educator
Place of work:
Cambridge University Hospitals
Email:
h.brown@addenbrookes.nhs.uk


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